VCNS Board of Directors tour Richmond Pumphouse – April 14th, 2018. By Brian Coffield

Pump House, Richmond
[ngg_images source="galleries" container_ids="18" display_type="photocrati-nextgen_pro_slideshow" image_crop="0" image_pan="1" show_playback_controls="1" show_captions="0" caption_class="caption_overlay_bottom" caption_height="70" aspect_ratio="1.5" width="100" width_unit="%" transition="fade" transition_speed="1" slideshow_speed="5" border_size="0" border_color="#ffffff" ngg_triggers_display="always" order_by="sortorder" order_direction="ASC" returns="included" maximum_entity_count="500"] Photo of wood batteau parts in water by Brian Coffield. Other photos by David Samuel. On April 14, 2018, after the VC&NS board of directors held their quarterly meeting in Powhatan, Virginia. The group attended an open house event at the Pump House in on the canal in Richmond.  The event was hosted by a group called "Friends of the Pump House". This group is a new organization that is working to restore the Pump House, a magnificent structure, to its former glory. The event mainly consisted of tours led by Lyn Lanier (also known as “Mr. Pump House”), who is a long time member of the VC&NS.  Later…
Read More

Inland Waterways International supports canal in Richmond

Canal in Danger, James River & Kanawha Canal, Richmond, Richmond, Save our Canal!, Virginia
To all those interested in the future of Richmond’s historic canal: The attached letter is from Mr. D.J. Ballinger, president of the international canal organization Inland Waterways International, containing a resolution of support for the preservation and wise use of the remains of the James River & Kanawha Canal in Richmond. Originally known as the James River Canal, it was the first operating canal system with locks in America. It first opened in 1789 and was completed into the Great Basin in 1800. The canal company elected George Washington as its honorary president and gave him a grand tour in 1791. Today, much of the canal is still intact in Richmond. The resolution was passed at the annual World Canals Conference, held this year in Yangzhou, China, on China’s Grand…
Read More

Richmond’s History along the canal also had a narrow gauge railroad.

Canal in Danger, James River & Kanawha Canal, Narrow Gauge Railroad, Richmond, Richmond, Save our Canal!, Virginia
Another aspect of the historical significance of the site of Venture Richmond's proposed amphitheater is the narrow gauge railroad tracks that are on the towpath of the south bank of the canal.  This railroad track probably connected Tredegar Iron Works with the iron works on Belle Isle.  The stone pillars and one section of trestle for this railroad line still survive in the James River.  Since this the site of the proposed amphitheater was formerly part of the Tredegar Iron Works grounds, it is very likely that these railroad tracks were actually manufactured at Tredegar Iron Works, and they may be among the few surviving tracks made at this foundry. These railroad tracks would have to be the first thing removed if the south bank of the canal were sliced…
Read More

Richmond, VA’s TV Channel 8 coverage of canal wall demolition.

Canal in Danger, James River & Kanawha Canal, Richmond, Richmond, Save our Canal!, Virginia
The Channel 8 reporter is interested in getting to the bottom of the demolition of the 150 feet of canal wall on city property.  She has done three stories so far.  Jennifer had some excellent quotes. http://www.wric.com/global/Category.asp?c=190525&clipId=7869757&autostart=true http://www.wric.com/global/Category.asp?c=190525&clipId=7873928&autostart=true http://www.wric.com/global/Category.asp?c=190525&clipId=7878963&autostart=true The reporter got the contractor for the 2nd St. Connector project to show her the plans for the project.  I did a screen save from the footage that shows 28 feet to be demolished on Venture Richmond property (see attachment below), yet Venture Richmond claims that they had no knowledge of any wall being removed on their property.   The Liesfeld Contractor claims that the 150 feet of city owned wall somehow "collapsed" when they were removing the 28 feet of wall, although this is certainly not true since I witnessed them…
Read More